Bamurru Plains

Bamurru Plains is an extraordinary bush experience on the edge of Kakadu National Park in Australia’s Northern Territory. The Top End of the Northern Territory experiences some of the greatest climatic extremes (wet and dry particularly) of any region of Australia. The coastal floodplains of northern Australia are home to prolific bird and wildlife (Australia's answer to the Okavango Delta) whilst Kakadu and Arnhem Land are the heartland of the country’s aboriginal culture. This ecologically sensitive luxury camp focuses on environmental sustainability and key luxury standards offering the highest levels of comfort.

The ten room camp safari lodge exudes ‘Wild Bush Luxury’ ensuring that guests are introduced to the sights and sounds of this spectacular environment in style and exclusivity. Each suite blends seamlessly with the surrounding bush, with a focus on the key luxury comforts,  a supremely comfortable bed, innovative Australian cuisine and premium wines (no TVs, minibars or telephones to distract from the wildlife outside). It is the soft touches that surprise in this remote bush location and the understated luxury is very much in tune with the environment.

In the evening, you'll sit back with a sundowner drink and canapés and enjoy the soft ‘Wild Bush Luxury’ touches that are the Bamurru trademark.  There is also an open bar, a small swimming pool and nature reference library.  Bamurru Plains, its facilities and 300 km² of country are exclusively for the use of its guests - a quiet, privileged outback experience.

Season: The camp is open from April 1 - October 31, 2021

Each of the ten en suite safari bungalows are designed to expose guests to the sights and sounds of the bush around them and ceiling to floor screening allows guests to look out across the floodplains at sunrise from the comfort of their bed.  As such there is no mini bar, TV, telephone or other electronic appliances to distract from the wilderness experience outside of the room. Each room has power points for recharging cameras, laptops etc.  Binoculars, torch, bird and plant reference books are provided.

Linen is 100% organic cotton with 500 thread-count.  Each guests has a choice of three pillows. Each bathroom has a high pressure shower with solar hot water.

Three bungalows have bi-fold doors to allow the room to be air conditioned, however, this does seal the room from the sounds of the surrounding bush. Three rooms can be air conditioned.  These 3 rooms also have extended verandahs that allow additional swag bedding for one adult or two children. (A swag is Wild Bush Luxury’s version of a rollaway bed. Swags are the Australian bedroll that have been used by generations of Australian pioneers.  It is a mattress that is inside a canvas cover and made up with quality sheets & pillows. They are custom made, comfortable and are suitable for children only). The remaining six have overhead fans and mesh screen walls that allow the coastal breezes to cool them. 


Five rooms have twin bed configurations with king singles, with joinable bed frames. Four rooms have king beds.
The Kingfisher Suite is ideal for families. It is three times the size, featuring a king size bed and deluxe swags for the children. It offers private dining and there's oodles of space to relax while the wildlife comes to you.



Each safari suite is ensuite and raised on a timber platform, with space for sitting out the heat of day with a good book or watching the local wildlife. With expansive floodplain views through Bamurru's trademark ceiling to floor mesh walls, it really does feel as if you are right amongst it with an intimate sense of connection to the wildlife and wilderness outside.
The communal guest lounge and dining area is the heart of the camp and a great place to meet fellow guests.

On the edge of the Timor and Arafura Seas and closer to the islands of Indonesia than much of Australia, the ‘Top End’ is a region of climatic extremes (wet and dry particularly), of spectacular storm skies and an annual cycle of environmental rebirth.

Each year the freshwater swamps are replenished by the flood waters that emanate from the escarpment country of Arnhem Land.  The big rivers swell and break their banks, the water and the crocodiles spread across the plains; Barramundi move from the mangroves to the creeks and water lilies flower, covering the billabongs with a carpet of color.  As the year progresses the waters retreat and the vast plains come into view once again, the grasses mellow to gold and the red dust contrasts with the brilliant blue of the sky.

Skimming across the floodplains on an airboat is one of the best ways to see the birdlife that congregates here.

Built amongst the fringing woodland on the edge of the Mary River floodplain, Bamurru Plains is the perfect spot from which to explore this country.  The day breaks to the tune of thousands of Magpie Geese, the whistling of the kites and the thumping of Agile Wallabies hopping by your bungalow.

A short distance away, the ancient ravines and escarpments of Arnhem Land are the stronghold of Australia’s aboriginal culture.  Rock art galleries record 50,000 years of Aboriginal occupation and reveal a depth of history and culture often hidden in modern Australia.

A scenic flight over Kakadu and the escarpment in the early months of the year is an awe inspiring experience as the waterfalls cascade from the plateau into the floodplains below.

An airboat ride is one of the best ways to see the birdlife that congregates here. On guided walks and drives search for brumbies, buffalo, dingos and wallabies or pause to look at an intriguing reptile or insect.

For guests looking for a sense of adventure, don't forget the treetop 'Hide' which is perched at canopy level on the edge of the floodplain and offers the chance to immerse in the sounds of the bush in complete seclusion.

As a business whose destiny is inextricably linked with the environment, the team at Bamurru are always working to the parameters that mother nature provides in the Top End, where so many seasons come in the space of a year.

When the drier than normal seasons occur, the expert Bamurru guides replace the water-based experiences with a swag of land based activities to explore Bamurru's beautiful riverine, paperbark and savannah woodland habitats. While drier seasons mean airboat activities can not take place, it does mean the country provides different opportunities to explore the landscape:-

* Walking is arguably the best way to take in the sights and sounds of the Australian bush.

* Guided safari drives to the more remote edges of the property and to spot birds and wildlife in the paperbark forests that surround the floodplains.

* More time is spent on the river, where crocodile densities are likely to be higher than usual as some individuals move off the floodplain.

* Early morning drives to the mouth of the Sampan River and the coastline on the edge of Van Diemen's Gulf will provide the chance to spot plains reptile and bird life as well as crocodiles.

* Bamurru's chefs have the opportunity to display their skills in in creating some fabulous bush breakfasts out on the property.

* Guests have the freedom to venture on to the pool deck after dinner for a star gazing extravaganza without fear of mosquito attack.

The 'Wild Bush Luxury’ concept brings a uniquely Australian style to your stay – a ‘down to earth’ yet attentive level of service; an appreciation of the finer details; and above all a team of hosts and guides who are passionate about the area and its wildlife. Along with this, we are immensely aware of our dependence on the environment and we make a firm commitment to the principles of sustainability and conservation.

Through interactive guiding and personalized hosting we aim to provide guests with an innovative natural experience that inspires a greater awareness of Australia’s unique and specialized environment.

While hosting guests in this ecologically unique environment, Bamurru Plains makes a firm commitment to the principles of sustainability and conservation.  Each aspect of the camp: from energy usage to waste disposal; choice of linen; recycling of bottles (they filter their own water and do not use plastic mineral water bottles) or the use of eco-certified cleaning materials has been carefully planned to minimize the impact on the land. Their investment in solar power at the camp is aimed at minimizing carbon emissions.

Their strongly held belief is tourism should help foster conservation of Australia's natural and cultural heritage and the rate includes a contribution to Australian Wildlife Conservancy, whose work on private sanctuaries around the country is at the forefront of protecting endangered species in Australia.

Country: